How to Write Great Handmade Jewelry Descriptions -10 Tips

Handmade Earrings Your handmade jewelry descriptions have to persuade someone that your jewelry is worth buying...

And just making a list of materials just doesn't go very far.

That's why spending time to hone your description is so important to your ultimate longterm success.

Here are some tips for making those product descriptions more likely to make the sale.

Tip #1: Think of the Title as a Headline

A great description has to first catch your readers attention. Make sure the title of your product is something that catches the eye and makes someone want to read further. You'll want your title to be both descriptive and representative, and not vague and "artsy". Remember, your title won't always be seen with the photo of your work. In search engine listing for example, the title and brief description is all the reader will see. Artsy titles will appeal to the reader more when they actually see the item on your product page.

Here are some examples

  • "The Perfect Mother's Day Bracelet" is a much better title than "Crystal Bracelet".
  • "A Summer Bracelet for Lazy Casual Evenings Out" is better than "Summer Shades".

Tip #2: Benefits are More Important Than Features

Focus your description on benefits (what's in it for me?) first before the features.

A quick overview of features vs. benefits.

What's a feature? A feature is a descriptor.

Here are some examples:

* Handmade, one of a kind piece
* Sterling silver components
* 16" long.

What's a benefit? The benefit is what that feature does for your customer.

To know what benefit to emphasize, you'll need to know your customer. What are they like? What is important to them? Are they looking for a feeling or experience? Do they need admiration and status? Or are they more concerned with getting something that doesn't break easily?

Here are some examples of benefits:

  • One of a kind There is non other like it in the world (Feeling unique is an emotional benefit that's important to lots of people)
  • Sterling silver Real silver is a luxury and we all need to be pampered sometimes, don't we? (Feeling pampered is sought after by many)
  • 16" long the perfect length for showing off a V-neck and to highlight the face. (Feeling attractive is a strong emotional desire that could be a benefit of your jewelry item.)
  • Strong Chain Links Durable and long lasting, and won't break when a baby pulls on it (Logical benefit)

Tip #3: Include Emotional Benefits and Logical Benefits

People buy for emotional needs, but rationalize with logical benefits so it's a good idea to hit on both. A good rule of thumb is to include 3 emotional benefits and 2 logical ones.

Examples of emotional needs:

  • Feeling loved
  • Feeling attractive
  • Feeling caring or nurturing
  • Feeling altruistic (this is a good one if a portion of your sale goes to charity)
  • Feeling spiritual
  • Feeling intelligent
  • Feeling unique

Examples of logical benefits:

  • Solves a problem (for example if it's a great gift solution for Mother's Day)
  • Money saving (like free shipping or a coupon savings)

Tip #4: Write Conversationally.

Throw out whatever you learned in school. No one wants to read formal, stilted descriptions full of self-important big words. Don't write a dissertation, and you're not making a legal argument either. Write like you speak, and you are much more likely to engage your reader.

Tip #5: Speak Directly to Your Reader

Here's a trick: Pretend you are talking to your best friend. One person only. If it sounds like you're having a chat with a friend, you'll build trust and likability, which ultimately is what will tips the scales for making your sale.

Tip #6: Use "You" instead of "I"

The sweetest word to a reader (other than the person's own name!) is the word "You".

So instead of talk about yourself and what you like about your product, talk about what the product will do for them.

For example...

"You'll feel like the Belle of the Ball on your wedding day"

is infinitely better than

"I created this necklace to suit the bride who wants to be the Belle of the Ball on her wedding day".

Tip #7: Stories are a Jewelry Seller's Best Friend

People often buy handmade jewelry so they can feel wise or insightful and you, believe it or not, YOU are often the biggest selling point especially is your work is very distinctive and unique, or if you yourself are distinctive and unique.

Depending on your market, you'll want to make decisions about what types of stories to tell.

Here are some jewelry story ideas:

  • How you came to be inspired for a piece
  • What funny thing happened that made you think to make this handmade necklace
  • The story behind an interesting found component
  • How one coincidence became a necklace.

Tip #8 Offer a Guarantee

You should always offer some kind of guarantee to increase your customer's comfort level and trust. The guarantee is up to you, but the sales increase is significant for people who offer guarantees, and you might be surprised to know that refund requests are about the same (or even less!) for those that are up front with their guarantee so it only makes sense to offer one.

Tip #9 Tell Your Reader What to Do Next

People are indecisive creatures. It's been proven time and again in sales tests that telling people to buy increases the likelihood that they will. That's why you often see "buy now" or "add to cart" on buttons. So be sure you tell people what to do next at the end of your description. This might be simple as saying click the "add to cart" button to place your order now.

Tip #10 Make it Easy to Buy

Finally, don't make your prospect jump through hoops. The less complicated it is to place an order the better. Try to make it as easy as possible with one click order buttons, and don't ask people for more information than you need. The easier it is to buy, the more sales you'll see.

Conclusion:

Ease of use and placing your customer at the forefront of your marketing will always increase sales. Try implementing some of these tips into your current sales pages and see what happens.

Do you have any handmade jewelry description tips or a comment? Share yours by adding a comment at the bottom of this article.

Christine Gierer

P.S. Writing is easier if you use templates and "swipe files" to improve your writing. (A swipe files is a collection of great words, headlines, and ads that help give you ideas. Do no plagiarize entire ads though! They are to give you ideas, not write your descriptions for you).

Here are some "swipe file" compilations and writing resources I recommend:

A book I use all the time is called Words that Sella by Richard Bayan. Filled with simple to use words and phrases that evoke certain feelings, and different openers, headlines, and closing statements, there are pages with "luxury" words, "comfort" words, "sensory qualities" and lots more. I often use this book when I write articles and when I write sales copy.

Another great book is Hypnotic Writing: How to Seduce and Persuade Customers with Only Your Wordsa by Joe Vitale. You might know him from that popular movie "The Secret", but he's a copywriter too. Filled with actionable steps you can take to improve your copy.

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19 Comments

  1. Posted May 31, 2010 at 6:40 pm | Permalink

    Great suggestions, have implemented what I could in my descriptions in a NZ website where I sell and look forward to increased sales!
    Thanks for all your work, very much appreciated!
    With kind regards,
    Ingrid

    • Christine
      Posted June 1, 2010 at 11:17 am | Permalink

      Glad to hear it Ingrid :)

  2. Posted May 31, 2010 at 10:04 pm | Permalink

    Wow!
    Do I have a lot of work to do! I am not a salesperson or a writer but in this business you have to learn to be jack of all trades (tax person, sales person, repair person, etc.,etc.,-you get it). This article is definitely going to help me. Thanks so much! I also love the examples because I am an example kind of person:)

    • Christine
      Posted June 1, 2010 at 11:17 am | Permalink

      My pleasure Janine.

  3. Posted June 1, 2010 at 10:41 am | Permalink

    The tips are great. I thought that I was doing pretty well with my descriptions, but I can see that I have fallen into some of the traps that you said to avoid.

    I can understand why your way would work better. It is funny that sometimes it takes someone else to tell you for it to make sense.

    Thanks so much!

    Rhonda Boyer

    • Christine
      Posted June 1, 2010 at 11:16 am | Permalink

      Thanks for the nice comments Rhonda.

  4. Posted June 2, 2010 at 8:03 am | Permalink

    I would much rather do this, however I thought I was supposed to be writing for seo optimization? When I do that my descriptions are really bland in the first sentence and the headline. What do you recommend to solve the problem? Is it better to be catchy ? Thanks

    • Christine
      Posted June 2, 2010 at 9:22 am | Permalink

      Great question Cynthia!
      You said,

      I would much rather do this, however I thought I was supposed to be writing for seo optimization? When I do that my descriptions are really bland in the first sentence and the headline. What do you recommend to solve the problem? Is it better to be catchy ?

      You need to craft your titles to please the search engines and humans too. So that means you strike a balance. Sometime you need to make pages that make sense for humans even if the keyword isn’t winnable. If at all possible try to find a long tail keyword that has at least some searches and use that keyword term, and always add terms that maybe you’d never win because they just aren’t targeted enough, but nevertheless are keywords that help support your main site concept.

      For example, your site is about paper crafts, so if you have a page that you want to make but that will never win a search engine ranking for your keyword term, nonetheless add words that complement… like “paper” and “craft” or whatever else you are trying to rank for.

      So to summarize- try to do both SEO and be engaging too.

      I hope that makes sense?

  5. Posted June 3, 2010 at 7:42 am | Permalink

    Ok I understand the part about making a balance. I’m confused on this part:

    “For example, your site is about paper crafts, so if you have a page that you want to make but that will never win a search engine ranking for your keyword term, nonetheless add words that complement… like “paper” and “craft” or whatever else you are trying to rank for.”

    I can add additional words to the key words ? Or I just add these words before and around in the article/listing? A lot of my key words are already 3-4 word terms.

    Thanks Christine!

    • Christine
      Posted June 3, 2010 at 12:56 pm | Permalink

      You’re losing me Cynthia – do you have winnable keyword terms? If so, you definitely want to have them in your title. If you can’t put them in your title, then your article may be off topic.

      It is less important that your description have the keyword term right at the beginning.

      One tip about keyword targeting – One mistake I made when I was starting out was writing pages targeting keywords that weren’t on point with my article, then wondered why I never ranked. Don’t do that. Make the page fit the keyword phrase.

  6. Posted June 4, 2010 at 7:31 am | Permalink

    I think we should just leave that alone. I think we are confusing each other and I do use my keywords so…..moving on.

    “One tip about keyword targeting – One mistake I made when I was starting out was writing pages targeting keywords that weren’t on point with my article, then wondered why I never ranked. Don’t do that. Make the page fit the keyword phrase.”

    I think I maybe doing that. I find a keyword first and try to stage the article around it but it seems i have to add words before and after to make it make sense. That concerns me…is that gonna lead down the wrong path?

    Thanks Christine!

    Cynthia

    • Christine
      Posted June 4, 2010 at 12:15 pm | Permalink

      Here’s what I know just from my own experience – if I’m dead on with what the searcher had in mind, meaning my content matches what the keyword term in intent, I get strong ranking results.

      When I try to “stage” it and make the keyword fit into the page, the page never seems to get ranked highly for my keyword no matter what I do.

      I can’t tell you why… It may have to do with bounce rates or with few inbound links (my dead-on content tends to get linked to by other people).

  7. Posted June 7, 2010 at 12:21 am | Permalink

    Learned a lot. Thank you for this informative article. Thanks.

  8. Posted November 28, 2010 at 8:08 am | Permalink

    Thank you so much for this article! I just published my website and now I can see some changes/additions I need to make. Thanks!

    • Christine
      Posted November 28, 2010 at 11:27 am | Permalink

      Very welcome :)

  9. Posted February 7, 2012 at 5:45 am | Permalink

    Great job!! Really a good idea on how can I write a description for handmade jewellery…I will surely use these tips..Thank you so much for sharing lovely post…

  10. Posted February 16, 2013 at 2:06 pm | Permalink

    Great advice! I wire wrap stones and sea glass as a specialty. When trying to think of creative ways to describe the stones and differentiate between the product can be tough. I find I am using the same basic words. I am going to look into the swipe files you have referred to and try changing up the descriptions. Thanks again and I look forward to receiving more advice from you.

  11. Posted March 18, 2013 at 8:55 pm | Permalink

    Just started this website today and look forward to implementing some of your ideas into making it a success.

    Previous website, and still is, http://www.shopqualityjust4you.com
    Just want to move on to a better one, but still might keep this one. I make jewelry, and I resale jewelry. I believe that your principles can both be applied to hand made jewelry as well as commercial jewelry. Thanks for all your help.

    • Christine
      Posted April 2, 2013 at 2:44 pm | Permalink

      I agree. I think the principles can apply in many many different businesses. Thanks for the comment~

One Trackback

  1. By Sell More Handmade Jewelry by Testing on January 13, 2012 at 1:06 pm

    [...] rate 3. Improve your jewelry product description.   If you are starting from zero, use the jewelry description tips to start fresh, or if you think your numbers aren't bad, change one element on your original. 4. [...]

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